Frequently Asked Questions

In-Home Care Program
This section covers frequently asked questions about our programs.

Medicaid/Missouri Healthnet In Home Care Program
Private Pay "Out of Pocket" Program
Title 19 & 20 Specialty Program

Home Care Patient Privacy Practices

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In-Home Care Program:

Q:
Can the aide run errands for the clients?
A:
Yes. We allow medical essential errands for both Medicaid and Private pay clients such as grocery shopping, prescription
drop-off/pick-up, mailing/payment of bills, etc.
Q:
Can the aide transport or escort the client to the doctor, the store, etc….?
A:
Medicaid: No. The Dept. of Health and Senior Services prohibits aides from transporting or escorting clients. The services are covered within the home only, for the client's safety.

Private-pay: Yes. As a self-pay client, you have the right to request that transporting and escorting is included in your service agreement .
Q:
Can the aide stay overnight with the client?
A:
Medicaid: No. The Department of Health and Senior Services prohibits the aide from residing (staying overnight at a client's home) or assuming guardianship.

Private-pay: Yes. As a self-pay client, you have the right to request that overnight service is included in your service agreement.
Q:
Do you have anyone who can visit the family, free of charge, to explain the services before we start?
A:
Yes. We will schedule a visit, at your convenience to introduce you to the company. During this meeting, we will explore all options for services. We can assist you with applying for the Missouri Healthnet (Medicaid) Program if you are not currently enrolled or discuss our private payment plans with you.
Q:
Do you have a minimum amount of hours that I must use daily?
A:
Medicaid: No. We will deliver services according to the approved amount of hours and days that the State of Missouri will cover according to the plan of care.

Private-pay: Yes. Most agencies require their private pay clients to receive at least 4 hours per shift. CDE only requires 3 hours minimum per shift if enrolled for 3 or more days.
Q:
Do you have a scheduling person on-call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for emergencies?
A:
Yes. We utilize an after-hour emergency line that forwards all after-hours calls to a scheduling staff member.
Q:
Am I allowed to request a replacement aide?
A:
Yes. We strive to meet our clients' satisfaction. In the event that you request a different aide, for whatever reason, we will honor your request promptly.
Q:
Am I allowed to refer/request someone that I know to service me?
A:
Yes. You are welcome to refer your own aide. All employment requirements and state regulations must be met.
Q:
What is the difference between "skilled" and "unskilled" medical care?
A:
"Unskilled" or "Non-medical" care typically refers to companion and personal care activities such as bathing, grooming, dressing, as well as assistance with meal preparation, light housekeeping and running errands. It could also include medication reminders, assistance with ambulation, and transportation to medical appointments. These types of services are typically provided by Home Health Aides (HHAs) or Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs), and can be arranged for anywhere from a few hours to 24-hours a day. "Unskilled" or "Non-medical" care is often sought by the elderly, new and expectant parents, individuals with disabilities, and those transitioning from a hospital or medical facility to home.

"Skilled" medical care follows a specific plan of care under the supervision of a Physician, Nurse (RN/LPN/LVN), or Therapist, and involves home healthcare services such as nursing care, physical, occupational, speech, and respiratory therapies, as well as social services and hospice care. Skilled medical care in the home can help provide a comforting solution to residing in a hospital, nursing home, or assisted living community.

 

 

Home Care Patient Privacy Practices:

Q:
Under what circumstances would my health information be used or disclosed?
A:
Under the following circumstances your health information may be used or disclosed after you have provided written consent: to provide treatment; to obtain payment; to conduct health care operations; for appointment alternatives; for treatment alternatives.
Q:
Under what circumstances would my health information be disclosed without first receiving my written consent?
A:
Under the following circumstances, your health information may be used or disclosed without your written consent: when there are risks to public health; to report abuse, neglect or domestic violence; to conduct health oversight activities; in connection with judicial and administrative proceedings; for law enforcement purposes; to coroners and medical examiners; to funeral directors; for organ, eye or tissue donation; for research purposes, in the event of a serious threat to health or safety; for specified government functions; for workers' compensation.
Q:
What are my rights with respect to my health information?
A:

The following is a brief overview of your rights with respect to your health information: Rights to request restriction; right to receive confidentiality communications; right to inspect and copy your health records, rights to a copy of our Notice of Privacy Practices.